•  You should receive a thorough face to face interview lasting 90-120 minutes.  This interview is comprehensive, looking at your use history as well as medical and mental health, and emotional and social factors.  It may be preceded by the use of assessment tools such as questionnaires.  A fair and accurate appraisal relies on how open and honest you are.  A skilled assessor can usually detect when someone is not being forthcoming and this will actually have the opposite effect from what the subject is trying to accomplish.  In other words, covering up the truth can end up being an indicator of a substance use problem. 

 

  • You will be asked to provide contact information for 2-3 people that know you and have your best interests at heart.  You will sign releases to allow the assessor to talk with them and incorporate this information into the assessment.  Click here to see the release form.

 

  • A written report will be prepared.  The report will include information about your history and current status and recommendations for any further steps that are needed.  These may be for treatment, counseling, additional screenings for medical or mental health concerns, etc.  This report and recommendations should be reviewed with you and referrals for additional services may be offered.

 

  • The assessment report will be furnished to those people you have authorized to receive a copy, including attorneys, probation officers, and other professionals.  Since courts usually require that recommendations are followed, you want to make sure that the recommendations are reasonable and are tailored for your situation and level of need.  Likewise, referrals should be to services and providers that are best suited to you and your situation.  Even if you are having an assessment that is not required by a legal situation, you want your assessor to make recommendations that are well suited to you so that you can get whatever help you may need.

What to expect from a professional chemical dependency assessment